Ecotourism in Alamo


The lower Rio Grande Valley has a natural habitat unlike anyplace else in the United States. Our region is host to a large volume of tourists solely drawn here to commune with over 400 species of birds and thousands of acres of ranch land and nature preserves. Ecotourism, or tourism based on a region’s natural resources, can be a lucrative draw for many cities with a unique local habitat and an incentive to help preserve the environment. Activities and attractions associated in areas with high rates of ecotourism include:

  • Bird watching
  • Photography
  • Stargazing
  • Camping
  • Hiking
  • Hunting
  • Fishing
  • Visiting wildlife parks

The Economic Impact of Ecotourism


Visitor bureaus in the area have long focused on initiatives that promote ecotourism and research shows that these measures are paying off. According to a recent study conducted by Texas A&M University’s Department of Recreation, Park & Tourism Sciences and the Department of Agricultural Economics, nature tourists now contribute to over $300 million annually to the City of Alamo and the rest of the lower Rio Grande Valley.

In addition to increasing profits, the study also showed that ecotourism has created over 4,407 full-time and part-time jobs, which is thought to be a conservative number as the study was conducted during the off-peak season.

A Thriving Ecotourism Industry in South Texas


While many cities with strong economies are tempted to develop natural resources into more profitable ventures, the fact remains that preserving these natural regions can go a long way toward protecting the environment, fueling the ecotourism industry in the RGV and benefitting our local economy.

For more information about what Alamo is doing to nurture, develop and embrace ecotourism, or to learn more about local incentives for your business, contact the Alamo Economic Development Corporation today at 956.787.6622.

© 2017 Alamo Economic Development Corporation
Web Design by Imagine It Studios